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In January of 2015, Delta will move SkyMiles, their frequent flier program, from earning miles based on distance flown and your status with the airline to a new system that bases your miles earned on the cost of the ticket and your status. In March of 2015, United’s MileagePlus program will take an almost identical step and turn into a miles earned based on spend and elite status system. American Airlines will keep their current mileage earning system in place for the foreseeable future but when they are done with some of the technical aspects of their merger with US Airways, I see them going to a model similar to Delta and United.

The New York Times has an article about the changes, calling them the “fadeout” of the mileage run. It is less of a fadeout and more of the complete death of the mileage run. The piece does a good job raising the concerns about confusion between redeemable miles earning and elite status earning, which will take place under two separate umbrellas. The more confusion there is for the end user, the more frustration. And while the average flier may not care, someone who does a bit of travel without keeping track of all the news and changes will certainly be a little annoyed. I also agree with the point that Mr. Barro makes about calling them “miles” after these changes. They are no longer based on distanced and merely represent an amount of money spent, making it much more appropriate to just call what you earn “points”. And while the examples of mileage earning and the losses faced by frequent fliers are illustrated in the New York Times piece, I think there are some unanswered questions about if and how basing mileage earning on spend will really be perceived by travelers and also, what it means for redemptions.

The New Earning Charts

In Delta’s case, if you are a non-status flier you will earn 5 miles per dollar spent. A Silver Medallion status flier will earn 7 miles per dollar spent, and so on. This is illustrated below per Delta’s calculator.

United’s changes are almost identical.

United MileagePlus 2015 Changes

It is nice that Delta’s calculator shows what you would earn in the old program and what you will earn on the same fare in the program. It makes it easy for a flier to look at the numbers and see just how good or bad these changes are for them.

Examples

Below are a few anecdotal examples to illustrate the gains and losses that frequent fliers and non-statused passengers will experience with these changes. I took the lowest available fare a month or more out for the different routes. Also, I focused on United, simply because they are who I fly, but the math for Delta would be very similar. I did not include taxes in the calculations as those are not included in the mileage earning for either airline. The fuel surcharges on international trips was included, again, because it is included in the calculations for mileage earning by the airlines.

The first example is a Portland, Oregon to Newark, New Jersey roundtrip. This one is my typical route and while the price fluctuates on this route, the $466 is reflective of a typical 7-day stay.

Sample Route Distance Fare Class
PDX-EWR-PDX 4,866 $466 Coach
2014 (Current) Earnings Member Silver Gold Platinum 1K
4,866 6,082 7,298 8,514 9,732
2015 (New) Earnings Member Silver Gold Platinum 1K
2,330 3,262 3,728 4,194 5,126
Difference Member Silver Gold Platinum 1K
-2,536 -2,820 -3,570 -4,320 -4,606

In this example you see that there is a loss of miles, regardless of elite status. A 1K would need to spend $885 2015 to earn near the same amount of miles that they would have earned in the program in 2014. With lots of competition on transcontinental routes, I see fares staying rather competitive for coach seats, meaning low fares, meaning low mileage earning.

The other side of this is the next example, the exact same route, Portland, Oregon to Newark, New Jersey, but this time, in first class.

Sample Route Distance Fare Class
PDX-EWR-PDX 4,866 $1,068 First
2014 (Current) Earnings Member Silver Gold Platinum 1K
7,298 8,514 9,730 10,946 12,164
2015 (New) Earnings Member Silver Gold Platinum 1K
5,340 7,476 8,544 9,612 11,748
Difference Member Silver Gold Platinum 1K
-1,958 -1,038 -1,186 -1,334 -416

While anecdotal, this example shows that paying more cash and sitting in the comfy seat does not necessarily generate more redeemable miles under the 2015 earnings programs. In fact, if your goal is to earn more miles, you are better off paying for the $1,500 refundable fare and doing an instant upgrade (if an elite on the airline).


 

Next is a long distance business class trip. A San Francisco-Frankfurt roundtrip priced as the average of what I could find for different months. There are spikes in price some months, but I found the $7,060 price to be pretty close to average.

Sample Route Distance Fare Class
SFO-FRA-SFO 11,398 $7,060 Business
2014 (Current) Earnings Member Silver Gold Platinum 1K
17,096 19,944 22,794 25,644 28,494
2015 (New) Earnings Member Silver Gold Platinum 1K
35,300 49,420 56,480 63,540 75,000
Difference Member Silver Gold Platinum 1K
18,204 29,476 33,686 37,896 46,506

In this example, the new 2015 program is extremely lucrative. The business class fare is high enough that everyone sees a significant gain in their redeemable miles earned. The 1K member actually doesn’t realize the full potential of the 11x multiplier because earnings on a single ticket are capped at 75,000 redeemable miles.

I then took the above business class example and made it an economy class booking instead. It’s not a bottom of the barrel example, it’s a mid-tier typical fare to Europe purchased somewhat in advance.

Sample Route Distance Fare Class
SFO-FRA-SFO 11,398 $1,400 Coach
2014 (Current) Earnings Member Silver Gold Platinum 1K
11,398 14,246 17,096 19,946 22,796
2015 (New) Earnings Member Silver Gold Platinum 1K
7,000 9,800 11,200 12,600 15,400
Difference Member Silver Gold Platinum 1K
-4,398 -4,446 -5,896 -7,346 -7,396

Again, everyone loses out on miles. Not incredibly large amounts, but there is definitely a loss.


Lastly, I’d like to look the one place where people will make a mint on miles compared to how many they are earning under the current program: The short distance but relatively expensive ticket. These are usually refundable or flexible tickets but are shorter distances (say, less than 500 miles each segment). It’s a typical business scenario and one that I wanted to explore. In this example it is Manchester, New Hampshire to Washington-Reagan via Newark-Liberty.

Sample Route Distance Fare Class
MHT-EWR-DCA-EWR-MHT 816 $1,366 Coach (Flexible)
2014 (Current) Earnings Member Silver Gold Platinum 1K
1,018 1,220 1,424 1,628 1,834
2015 (New) Earnings Member Silver Gold Platinum 1K
6,830 9,562 10,928 12,294 15,026
Difference Member Silver Gold Platinum 1K
5,812 8,342 9,504 10,666 13,192

What Does This Mean?

In short, the majority of travelers regardless of airline elite status, who fly on discount or regular coach class tickets, are going to lose redeemable miles under the new system. The new system is going to reward those on very expensive business/first class travel and those who have to buy refundable or flexible tickets. The ones who will see some of the biggest increases in miles are the short distance fliers who buy those refundable tickets. They are spending less time in a seat but paying more money for the privilege and the airlines are rewarding that.

Some, who I respect, have this to say:

When asked why:

And while Mr. Harteveldt isn’t incorrect that there is an element of low-yield travel created by gaming the mileage run system, the idea that this makes the airlines completely unprofitable and those passengers are a huge cash sink for those airlines, is a stretch. Truth is, airlines need some of that low-yield travel to fill seats that would otherwise go empty. The difference now is that Delta and United do not want to hand out the same number of miles for that seat. However, this has less to do with “rewarding” someone than it does with simply not putting the miles on the balance sheet.

The Cost of Miles

Regardless of how the airlines word these changes the real issue comes down to cost. The miles that the airlines have a cost associated to them for the airline. The airline records the outstanding miles on their balance sheets as liabilities. At some point, someone will redeem their miles and the airline will either pay a partner for the flight the passenger takes, or they will remove a seat from their own inventory for that passenger to sit in. There is a tangible cost here. In fact, when the Star Alliance recently changed their rules on reward redemption charges allowing carriers to set their own price for their premium cabin rewards, United responded by making partner rewards very expensive. If someone wants to redeem miles for a seat that Lufthansa charges United $5000 for, then United wants to collect more miles from that passenger.

The fact that airlines have millions upon millions of miles outstanding on their balance sheet does not look good to their accountants nor their investors, so in the changes to reward mileage earning, we’re seeing a shift. The newly rewarded miles will essentially be “paid for” up front (at least partially) while the old miles are removed from the balance sheets over time.

Want more proof that this is at least some of the motivation? Look at United’s page discussing the changes.

Mileage Redemption Options

That’s right, you can redeem your miles for Economy Plus seats on a specific flight, an Economy Plus subscription, and a checked baggage subscription. None of those three things has any real cost to United. If you use your miles for an Economy Plus seat on a specific flight, United is only out the $39 or $49 they would have charged someone had no elite member been available to take advantage of that seat as part of their benefits. If you use your miles for a checked baggage subscription, there is no cost to United, simply a slight drop in ancillary revenue on that flight, though even that is probably offset by the fact you spent miles on it. The cost for the airline is minimal while the benefit for them is taking more of the liability off of the balance sheet.

Even more proof of this is Delta’s recent announcement that there will soon be a limit on how many American Express Membership Rewards points one can transfer into SkyMiles (250,000 Membership Rewards points in a calendar year). Delta wants to limit the incoming liability of miles even though American Express has been one of their best partners.

The airlines are tying miles earned to how much you paid for a fare not just because “it’s rewarding” but because it limits their exposure to liability. Plain and simple.

What Do I Do Now?

The answer to this question is simple: Mileage earning shouldn’t be the determining factor of your airline loyalty, especially with these changes.

The argument used to be that a person could put up with the bad aspects of a carrier if the rewards were worth it. With the rewards quickly becoming based on spend and less on miles flown, why fly that airline over another if the price is the same? For example, I give United my business, even with the terrible Recaro seats, on a transcontinental flight because I value those points. With the mileage earning changes, my comfort takes priority and if that means a flight on Delta, so be it.

This isn’t to say that for everyone mileage earning is the deciding factor, in fact, I would say it’s a small percentage of people who actually care about this piece of the frequent flier game. I remember a discussion a long time ago about how most travelers redeem their miles for simple domestic rewards, sometimes paying the higher mileage rate to avoid paying what they considered a high fare.

There is also an option to earn the original redeemable miles as you have all along, the catch is, you have to not care about elite status. In the terms and FAQs of each airline’s new redeemable miles program (United | Delta), there is a statement regarding tickets booked on partner airlines. If you book on a partner’s ticket stock, basically who took your money, then you are still eligible to earn reward miles at the 2014 rates, but you in almost all cases, you will not earn elite miles. So you have a choice, become an elite with Delta or United or earn the 2014 redeemable mileage rates.

You could also play the credit card churning game to earn redeemable miles. I find it too time consuming and a ton of work to keep track of what cards need what minimum spend and which ones I haven’t signed up for yet. Some people love that game but for me, it just isn’t worth the time or the energy.

Another choice would be to start flying American Airlines. They are the last of the large U.S. carriers to have a mileage flown is what you earn rewards program and it will stay that way. Well, until they are done with their merger with US Airways, then I would say the chances are very good they too will move to a points based on spend system. Sure, bloggers will post about how great American is and how they are using their miles to go somewhere far away, but that I feel will be a short lived game. There is a year, maybe two left for the greener pastures on American. Feel free to make that move if you are prepared to make another move or choice when American decides to go to a system similar to Delta and United.

Like I said above, the answer is simple: Fly places, do it affordably and comfortably, and worry less about the miles being earned. That was a little difficult for me to write. I used to see a cheap fare somewhere and say, “a weekend there would be nice and the miles would be nice too” and buy a ticket. The miles were an incentive for me to buy a fare to go someplace new that I may not have been inclined to pay for, now I’ll just go new places knowing the earnings will not be as high.

Is There Any Chance The Airlines Change Their Minds?

The airlines changing their minds on this is unlikely. Why would they? They can now reward fewer miles and even cap them for their most “loyal” travelers. The cap at 75,000 miles on a single ticket is something that blows my mind. You (or your company more likely) drop $8,000 on a business class ticket to Asia and you get capped at 75,000 miles. United and Delta find you loyal, but only 75,000 miles loyal.

I think the only real way any of this changes is if the airlines struggle in the coming years. If people stop flying due to the economy or because of fares or whatever, then I could see the airlines reeling these mileage earning changes back to what they used to be, but even that is unlikely. Another scenario is that corporate accounts start complaining to the airlines. These companies pay a lot of money for their employees to travel and if those employees start complaining, it’s likely the corporate travel sales folks will get wind of it. But, there is nothing keeping Delta or United from sweetening the pot and giving those contracts some kind of mileage bonus every year, so even the idea of corporate contracts getting pulled is a stretch.

Lastly, I do see this changing some people’s behavior and that’s not necessarily a good thing. People who have the freedom to book via airline websites for their corporate travel could get themselves into trouble pursuing more expensive fares to earn more miles. To combat this, companies may enforce their corporate policies more stringently, taking away some money from Delta/United if they are not the cheapest carriers in a particular market.

In Summary

Overall the biggest problem with the new mileage earning programs is that they not only earn less miles for the frequent yet affordable traveler, but they are confusing programs now. You will still earn your elite status based on two criteria, qualifying dollars and qualifying miles, the latter being based on distance flown, but you will earn redeemable miles based on fare paid. It is even confusing to type.

These programs change on a whim. There are rumors (see footnote at bottom of page) that Delta’s Medallion Qualifying Dollars minimum is increasing for next year. It’s unconfirmed but if true, means these programs will get tweaked and changed as the airlines see fit. They will look to cut out the chaff and focus on people who are spending a lot of money. Pundits can say this rewards more profitable fliers but even that doesn’t take into account the caps on what a person can earn on a single ticket. This is about reducing costs and liabilities for the airlines. As the airlines see fit, they will make more changes to reduce those costs.

Focus on the good stuff. See a cheap fare to a place you want to visit and you have the cash? Buy it. Stop focusing on the miles and get out there and see the world. Miles, upgrades, rewards, etc. are all fun things but if they hinder the actual visiting of places, don’t focus on them.

Recently a number of airlines have been offering decent business class deals to Europe during off peak seasons. I have a feeling that this will become a new normal. We will see $1,500 business class fares to Europe from Houston, San Francisco, etc. when the airlines need to fill seats that would otherwise go empty. Take advantage of that. You’ll earn some miles and you will get a nice seat across the Pond.

For me, I am bummed about the move. I loved having a small incentive for a weekend trip somewhere I wanted to visit anyway. I loved being able to burn miles on the few trips my wife and I were able to take longhaul. My plan going forward is to continue to earn elite status simply because I am on the road so much but as soon as I hit a level I am comfortable with, my plan is to switch to booking on partner airlines and earning the old rates for that level that I reached. It’s a hybrid plan but one I think may have some benefits for me. If I was to stick to just flying United tickets everywhere, just like I do now, then I would lose out on around 95,000 miles, possibly more once I do the math for my end of year stats. My company spent a lot of money for my work travel and I spent a fair amount of cash on personal travel but that is only worth so much to United. Clearly, I am a low-yield passenger.

In any case, I hope you make the decision that works best for you financially and travel wise. Happy flying!

Edit: It is now confirmed that Delta is raising the qualifying dollars required for 2016 SkyMiles Medallion elite status.

Southwest unveiled their new livery this morning and while I am not a huge fan of the font or the colors, it seems they really thought about unifying their look. The bubble font is what bothers me the most. I thought bubble fonts were dead and we all said “good riddance”. I guess not.

A new commercial accompanied the livery unveiling and it’s a different marketing approach from previous Southwest spots and I like what they did. They talk about their customers, their commitment and how much their employees matter.

The week of June 30th was insanely busy. I was traveling from Austin to New York for work, then back to Austin to start our move/drive to Portland and, to top it of, the end of the week was the Fourth of July. My trip started smoothly and it was a relatively standard week at work until Wednesday. The northeast was hammered by a large storm on Wednesday night and those same storms were predicted to flare up again on Thursday.

Knowing that I had to be home on Thursday night, I decided to look for seats on earlier flights out of New York but found nothing, probably due to the storms the previous night. I made my way to LaGuardia a little early, hoping to get on any flight that would get me out of the New York metro area earlier. Different agents did their best, but every single option was full.

My routing to Austin was LaGuardia-Chicago O’Hare-Austin and we actually boarded the LaGuardia-Chicago segment right on time. Then we sat at the gate. And sat some more. Then kept sitting. In all, we spent about 45 minutes parked at the gate with the door closed. When we started our taxi out to the runway the captain announced that it would be a while and we were free to use our cellphones. I started looking at the later Chicago-Austin flight on United, deciding that was a good backup in case things did not improve in New York and booked myself on it.

After another hour and 45 minutes the captain announced that we were ready for takeoff but that we were really close to the FAA three-hour tarmac rule and he was not sure if we would make it to the runway in time to be in compliance so we would be returning to the gate. By this point, I was in danger of missing my newly rebooked later flight from Chicago to Austin and was really worried that the beginning of our move was in serious jeopardy. I used different websites and the United iPhone app to look at different options to Austin, Lubbock, Albuquerque, Dallas, and Houston to see if there was any way to get to that region either late at night or early the next morning. In my experience, holiday travel, or travel on an actual holiday, is usually pretty light but from my searches, July 4 was the complete opposite. There were barely any seats out of New York at all.

When the crew opened the door to the plane to allow people to buy food, go to the restroom, and talk to the agents, I searched even more frantically for a seat on any airline from NY to the general Austin region. I was in luck, JetBlue had a non-stop flight from JFK leaving at 9:30pm and arriving in Austin at 11:45pm and there were two seats for sale. I spoke to the lead flight attendant and he said there was no way we were going to make it to Chicago in time for my connection. My options were JetBlue, be stuck in Chicago with very few seats available, or be stuck in New York with a few more options the next day. A few of the passengers around me asked what I was worried about and I told them. I also expressed my concern about beating the Van Wyck at 7pm. They understood and helped me weigh my options.

Just before the door was going to be closed to attempt another go at getting out of NY I grabbed my suitcase and told the gate agent my intentions. She was fine with it and walked back into the now chaotic terminal with me. Other flights were being cancelled left and right and I told her that there was a JetBlue flight I was going to catch. She told me that United could not move my ticket over to JetBlue and let her know that I was fine with that and to just uncheck-me in, which she did.

Before heading to JFK I made one last attempt to see if there was anything out of Newark or that evening but had no luck. The agent at the United Club “protected” me on the July 4th evening flight non-stop from Newark to Austin. I knew I was not going to use that but it at least gave me options. I then headed straight for the taxi stand at LaGuardia. The one in front of the central terminal was very crowded but the one at the end, near the American Airlines gates was completely empty and I was quickly on my way to JFK. While changing airports, I tried to book the JetBlue ticket online but it kept failing. When it finally looked like it was going to work, I was within the 1.5 hour before flight time cut-off for online bookings. I would have to try my luck in the airport.

The cab driver knew I was in a hurry and was more than willing to speed, arriving at JFK only twenty minutes after leaving LaGuardia. Yes, you read that right, twenty minutes from LaGuardia to JFK. I have never departed JFK, only arrived, and I had definitely never been to JetBlue’s Terminal 5, but I quickly found one of the ticketing/check-in lines.

The line was long, but not nearly as long as the line for cancellations and rebookings. I was also on the phone calling JetBlue, just in case I could get through and book the ticket that way. Luckily, the line moved relatively quickly and thirty minutes later I was being called to the counter. I asked the agent, Neomi, if I could buy a seat on the non-stop to Austin, to which she replied, “I am not sure we have any seats left, but I will check”… A few tense seconds go by, she raises her eyebrows and says, “Look at that, we have two seats, let me get one secured for you”. This all took place about forty five minutes before the scheduled departure time. She took my credit card, ID, and my Known Traveler Number and printed out a boarding pass, with PreCheck! I told the agent how much it meant to be getting home that night and told her “I could hug you” and surprisingly, she obliged, coming from around the check-in counter and giving me a huge hug.

Through security in no time, I decided to charge my now dead phone and give my wife a call to let her know I would be getting to Austin that evening. As I watched the flight status boards, I noticed my newly booked flight become delayed. This wasn’t a surprise, there was a large storm cell passing nearby and there was a lot of lightning.

After giving my phone a little more life, I went to the gate and learned the delay would extend until 11:30pm ET, with a scheduled arrival into Austin at 2:30am CT. Hey, at least I am getting there. I checked the status of my original flight and it too was delayed until 11:30pm, so I made the correct decision. Being really late into Austin is much better than being really late into Chicago in need of a hotel room.

The delay gave me a little time to explore Terminal 5. I walked around a bit and found that there were a number of seating areas with a decent number of places to charge devices, though I would prefer a few more. The food options are good and I was able to buy some fruit, a granola bar, and some water without much of a wait. I did not visit a bar but there appeared to be a number of options there as well, including the little kiosks near some of the gates that allow you to order food and have it delivered to where you are sitting.

Eventually, boarding was called for our flight and being in an Even More Space seat, we were called to board near the beginning. Unfortunately, everyone else was tired of the delay and decided to make boarding very chaotic. No big deal, there was plenty of space in the overhead bins for my rollaboard and the seats were so spacious I had no problem putting my backpack under the seat in front of me with room to spare.

The seats were comfortable and spacious, my only complaint being the lack of “wings” on the headrests. If they had the adjustable headrest the product would be unbeatable, even if it is a little older. Without the wings, it was very hard to rest my head in a manner that was comfortable. I didn’t watch the free DirecTV but the picture looked fine before I turned it off.

Our flight landed in Austin at 2:30am and I was quickly on my way home. The next morning we started our drive to Portland delayed just over an hour due to me needing a tad bit more sleep. We kept our schedule pretty well and arrived in Portland just about exactly when we had planned, all thanks to a speedy cab driver and JetBlue.

My first experience on JetBlue, even with taking a delay, was extremely positive. The staff were friendly and helpful, the plane had nice seats, and, most importantly, the flight got me to Austin. Given all of the weather that had moved through the northeast, it was very likely I would not have reached Austin before 6:30pm the next day had it not been for JetBlue.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics released the May consumer price index summary yesterday and within it was a piece of data that has gone somewhat unnoticed.

The index for lodging away from home rose 2.0 percent and has increased 4.0 percent over the last three months. The index for airline fares rose sharply in May; its 5.8 percent increase was the largest since July 1999.

And…

The index for all items less food and energy has risen 2.0 percent over the last 12 months; this is the highest figure since February 2013. The 12-month increase in the shelter index reached 2.9 percent in May, its highest level since March 2008. The index for airline fares has increased 4.7 percent over the span, and the medical care index has risen 2.8 percent. Indexes that have risen more modestly over the past 12 months include apparel (0.8 percent), new vehicles (0.5 percent), and used cars and trucks (0.2 percent).

Airline prices are on the rise and with oil prices likely to rise in the coming weeks there will be little relief. But hey, consolidation is a good thing. Right?

At Birmingham Airport in the UK there was a series of days with severe crosswinds in March. The video below is a compilation of landings from one of those days from YouTube user flugsnug. Around 4:40 into the video you can see a United 757-200 departure and get an idea of just how strong the crosswind is, it picks the plane up and pushes it sideways during the climb.

Check out some other crosswind videos and pictures.

Etihad, the flag carrier of the United Arab Emirates, has released images and videos of their A380 and 787 products. All are interesting but the A380 first class product is what stands out. In it, there is a single three-room compartment area that can be occupied by two passengers called “The Residence”. Each residence consists of a living room, a bathroom, and a bedroom.

Etihad A380 - The Residence

Etihad A380 Residence – The Living Room

Etihad has posted a video of the Residence layout and general look and feel.

They have also uploaded a video narrated by Dannii Minogue, giving a better feel for what the seat layout and bathroom will be like.

The bedroom will have a full size bed and can accommodate two people.

The Residence Bedroom

Etihad A380 Residence – The Bedroom

The bathroom will have a private shower and plenty of personal care amenities.

Etihad A380 Residence - The Bathroom

Etihad A380 Residence – The Bathroom

On top of all of this, passengers in the Residence will have a private butler.

Starting price? You can look to part with close to $20,000 for a one-way flight between London and Abu-Dhabi in the Residence. Even for what you are getting, for what maxes out at an eight hour flight, $20,000 one-way is mighty steep.

There are a lot of posts out there talking about how amazing this new product is and they all end with “these will not be available as award redemptions”. So, if you want to book one of the Residences, you are going to need to pay cash, something very few of the people touting this product as “amazing” and “groundbreaking” are willing to do. At the $20,000 price point per person, you are coming very close to private jet prices and then you could fit more people and spread out the cost somewhat. While Etihad’s first class private cabin looks really cool and makes for great marketing, I am more interested in the products that I actually have potential to fly. Etihad will also have 9 first class “Apartments” which will still have a ton of privacy and space but will not feature the separate bedroom and the bathroom will be shared with other first class passengers (there is a shower in that bathroom as well).

Eithad A380 - The Apartment

Eithad A380 – The Apartment

Not wanting to drop the cash on first class? Etihad’s new business class on the A380 and the 787-9 looks fantastic and perfectly suited for a long haul flight where I needed to be into work the next day.

There is a ton of space in what Etihad is calling the “Business Studio”. The small flat surface to the side allows you to keep your essentials within arms reach and still have space to spread out.

Etihad - Business Studio

Etihad – Business Studio

Etihad - Business Studio

Etihad – Business Studio

Etihad has also provided another Dannii Minogue narrated video of their Business Studio cabin.

Lastly is the economy cabin which seems to have received some very intriguing features. The first thing I noticed were the headrests. They have a built-in wing on them to allow for leaning into, great for a nap. I do not know if Etihad will do away with pillows because of this feature, but it does allow you to rest your head without worrying about the wing on your headrest collapsing. The other thing you will notice is the inflight entertainment and the power ports in the seat in front of you. This is a huge plus for passengers. Being able to stay entertained and keep your own devices charged is one of my biggest needs when traveling and Etihad has made both of those things of the past with the A380 and 787-9 economy product that they are calling the “Economy Smart Seat”.

Korean Air - 777-200ER

Today is the big day, Korean Air is arriving from Seoul around 8:30am CT, bringing the first non-stop passenger service between Houston and the capital of South Korea. The flight is being operated by a Boeing 777-200 with three classes of service, first, business, and economy. It appears they will be featuring their new product on the route, the Kosmo suite in first and the Prestige sleeper seat in business, both of which are lie-flat seats. The economy seat is also a new product featuring audio and video on demand and power and USB ports available for each seat. The seat map below shows the layout of the cabin.

Korean Air 772 Seatmap

Korean Air has an extensive route network and gives Houstonians another great option for getting to Asia. Seoul’s Incheon International Airport, while far from the city center, is a great airport for connections and offers plenty of amenities, including free shower rooms for transiting passengers. They also offer free tours of Seoul for transiting passengers, which is a great way to see a city rather than sitting an airport waiting for your connection.

I should note that Korean also flies into Gimpo International Airport, the smaller, closer to the city airport, with flights only serving Asian destinations. But, if you are spending a few days in Seoul and then continuing on elsewhere in Asia, Gimpo is a great option with frequent flights and an easily accessible location close to the city center.

This is a fantastic option for travelers to get to Asia. Of course, I wish it was Asiana Airlines with their ties to the Star Alliance and United, but another carrier at Houston offering more flights is never a bad thing.

The Korean Air flight departs Houston for Seoul at 10:40am and arrives in Seoul at 3:10pm the next day. Current summer prices on the route range anywhere from $1500 round-trip to $2000 round-trip in economy. Korean Air is a member of the Skyteam airline alliance.